ODTUG Webinar about Version Control for PL/SQL

This week I hosted a webinar for ODTUG members about how to implement a version control solution for the Oracle Database using Git. Many thanks to the 119 attendees who joined the live event. I am very happy to see that version control is now being recognized as a serious pain point among Oracle Database customers.

Please see below for the video and the slides of the presentation:

Webinar Video and Slides

Last week, we hosted another webinar to talk about Gitora and how it helps Oracle developers manage their PL/SQL code base. Below are the slides we used during the webinar:

You can watch the recording of the webinar below:

Gitora in 30 Minutes

Gitora is the version control tool for PL/SQL. It hooks Git to the Oracle Database and enables you to manage your PL/SQL code base easily. Below is a 30 minute demo video which explains the benefits of Gitora and how it works.

Would you like to develop and deliver faster with PL/SQL? If yes, then contact us for a free one our review of your software development lifecycle.

Rhenus Uses Gitora

It’s been a little over three months since we released Gitora 2.0 and the first success stories have already started to surface. Here is one of them:

Rhenus Logistics, the leading logistics company from Germany uses Gitora to manage their Oracle Database.

Problem

Rhenus IT uses both Java and PL/SQL to serve their users and customers. They have a team of about 10 PL/SQL developers. The team manages more than 20,000 database packages, views, functions, procedures, object types and triggers spread over 30+ database schemas.

Rhenus IT wanted to move to a continuous delivery environment in which they can be more agile and deliver solutions to the business faster. Managing the PL/SQL code was the hardest piece of the puzzle.

Solution

After experimenting with other solutions in the market, Rhenus decided to move forward with Gitora.

Gitora enabled Rhenus Developers to:

  • Use Git, the prominent open source version control system used by millions of developers.
  • Move their database code between development and various staging databases automatically.
  • Move code between source and target databases very fast because Gitora only executes differences between source and target databases, without comparing the code bases in both databases first (which can be very time consuming).
  • Enforce check-in, check-out of database objects at the database level.
  • Automate build process for the database code using Gitora API’s.
  • Implement an affordable continuous delivery solution compared to alternatives.

Michiel Arentsen, the System Architect at Rhenus who implemented the solution at Rhenus has started an excellent blog in which he writes about his Gitora implementation. We highly recommend you to check it out. Below are the list of blog posts he wrote which should be very useful to anyone who is currently implementing Gitora at his/her company:

Using Gitora in PL/SQL Developer dual or multi session mode

Automatically log in to Gitora when connecting to Oracle

A fast way to load your database objects to a Gitora repository

Automatically add new database objects to Gitora

Start Gitora as a Windows service

Gitora 2.1 is available with tagging support

We are happy to announce that Gitora 2.1 is available for download. Along with a few bug fixes, Gitora 2.1 enables PL/SQL developers to use Git Tags to label any commit point in the Git repository.

Tags can be used for a variety of use cases but the most common one is to label a Commit ID for specific versions of the code base such as tagging a specific commit with the label “Version 2.0”.

It is very easy to create tags in Gitora. Simply, go to the local commands menu, select “Create Tag” menu item under “Tags”.

gitora-tags-menu

 

A dialog shows up.

Create Tag Dialog

Enter the name of your tag (no spaces). Enter the commit ID you’d like to attach it to. If you’d like to attach your tag to the HEAD i.e. the most recent commit in the current branch, leave the Commit ID field empty. You may also use a branch name instead of an actual Commit ID.

Click OK to create the tag. If the tag is attached to a commit visible in the Gitora repository browser, it will show up in the Gitora Application.

Gitora Repository Browser

To delete a tag, select the Delete a Tag menu item under the Tags menu, enter the name of the Tag you’d like to delete and click OK.

Tags are available in Gitora 2.1 Professional Edition. Enjoy! 🙂

Kind Regards,
The Gitora  Team

Gitora Webinar Video and Slides

We hosted a webinar about Gitora last week. It received more than 400 signups and over 120 people have attended the event. The interest to the webinar was so high that we hit the 100 attendee limit of the webinar software we are using. Thanks to everyone who attended and helped us to do a better webinar with their questions and comments.

If you could not make it to the webinar, you can watch it or view the slides below. The webinar consists of two parts. In the first part, we talk about transition strategies to move an organization from manual version control for PL/SQL to version control with Gitora. In the second part, we showed the capabilities of Gitora with a live demo.

 

Gitora, Version Control for PL/SQL from Gitora

Gitora Webinar

OK, so you read the web site, downloaded Gitora, installed it successfully, created a few test repositories, added a few packages, issued a few Git commands from the Gitora UI. And it all works fine. But now what? How do you actually start using Gitora in your development life cycle? How can you actually benefit from it?

In order to show you how you can use Gitora in your daily work we are hosting a free webinar on November 22nd. You can register at: http://www.prohuddle.com/webinars/Gitora/Version_Control_for_PLSQL_Developers.php

During the webinar we will cover the following topics with a live demo:

  • How can you use Gitora to manage your PL/SQL code base?
  • Why is using version control with PL/SQL is hard and how does Gitora help?
  • Why is Gitora the best solution for the problem?
  • How will using version control with PL/SQL will help you?

The webinar is free but space is limited. Sign up today.

Kind Regards,
Yalim Gerger
Founder

 

Installing Gitora Manually

We created a solid installer for Gitora which has a very high success rate. However, IT environment can be very complex and restrictive (and understandably so). So having an installer does not work for everyone and every organization.

Therefore, today we are making the Gitora 2.0 installation scripts available for download. Below are the steps you can follow to install Gitora 2.0 to your environment manually.

Installation of Middletier Components

  1. For Linux and Mac OS, install Git manually from https://git-scm.com/. For Windows, Git is already included to this setup.
  2. Move Gitora2 folder to the place you want to locate Gitora middle tier components.
    e.g /Users/username/
  3. For Windows, open fix_parameters_WINDOWS.bat to edit.
    For Mac OS, open fix_parameters_MAC.sh to edit.
    For Linux, open fix_parameters_LINUX.sh to edit.
  4. Set GITORA_ROOT parameter to the absolute path of the Gitora2 folder from step 1..
    e.g /Users/username/Gitora2
  5. Set GITORA_DATABASE_CONNECTION_STRING parameter to the correct jdbc connection string to your database.
    e.g jdbc:oracle:thin:@192.168.1.99:1521:orcl
  6. For Mac OS and Linux, set GIT_EXECUTABLE parameter to the path of git executable.
    e.g. /usr/bin/git
  7. Open command line terminal and run fix_parameters_WINDOWS.bat for Windows, fix_parameters_MAC.sh for MAC OS, fix_parameters_LINUX.sh for Linux.

Installation of Database Components

  1. Connect to the Oracle Database with the SYS user
  2. Run 01_SYS.sql
  3. Disconnect from SYS
  4. Connect to the database with the GITORA user
  5. Run 02_GITORA.sql
  6. Ensure that there are no invalid packages in GITORA schema.
  7. Create a row in table GITORA.T_TEMP_APPLICATION
  8. Copy the contents of Gitora.xml to this newly created row
  9. Issue a commit to save this row to the database.
  10. Run 03_GITORA.sql
  11. Disconnect from GITORA user
  12. Connect to the database with SYS user
  13. Open 04_SYS.sql and replace the two occurrences of @VERSIONCONTROL_HOST@ keyword with the IP address of your Gitora middle tier machine, where Gitora web server and middle tier components are installed. You need to ensure that your middle tier machine is accessible from database machine by checking network and firewall settings of both machines.
  14. For Windows, change the value of “folderSeparator” parameter from ‘/’ to ‘\’.
  15. Run 04_SYS.sql
  16. Disconnect from SYS.

Starting Up Gitora

  1. For Windows, run Gitora2/apache-tomcat-7.0.69/bin/startup.bat.
    For Mac OS and Linux, run Gitora2/apache-tomcat-7.0.69/bin/startup.sh
  2. Open your browser and type http://[MIDDLE TIER IP ADDRESS]:7997/gitora/main.html name=Gitora

Generating a Diff Script in Gitora

Gitora 2.0 enables developers to generate a DDL script from the Git repository which can be used to synchronize source code between two databases. For example, this feature can be used to generate a script to syncronize a production database to the latest version of the source code. This tutorial explains how to use this feature in Gitora 2.0.

Open the Gitora Application. Select a Git repository. Next, click the Get Script button either from the menu bar Local Commands –> Utilities –> GetScript or from the tool bar.

Get Script

Alternatively, click the Get Script icon in the Local Commands toolbar section.

Get Script Button

 

The Get Script Dialog shows up.

Get Script Dialog

Enter the Starting Git Commit ID and the Destination Git Commit ID. Use the keyword HEAD if you’d like to use the latest commit in the current active branch as the Destination Commit ID.

Click the Download DDL Script button. Gitora will generate a DDL script which, if executed, will syncronize a schema (or a group of schemas) which is currently at the Starting Commit Point ID, to the Destination Commit Point ID.

For example, this feature can be used to apply the latest version of the source code to a production database. If the production database is at Git Commit Point A and the new production-ready version of the source code is at Git Commit Point B, a developer can enter A as the Starting Commit ID and B as the Destination Commit Point ID and then execute the generated script in the production database.

How to Connect to Remote Databases

Gitora 2.0 enables developers to clone, fetch and pull code from remote Oracle Databases. An important step to use these features is to establish a connection between source (i.e. remote) and destination Gitora installations This tutorial explains how to create this connection.

1. Install Gitora to Source and Destination Databases

In order to be able to perform remote database operations, Gitora must be installed to both databases.

2. Enter the Connection information for the Remote Gitora Installation

Open the Gitora Application for the destination database. Under the menu bar click File –> Manage Remote Gitora Connections.

Menu Bar

The Remote Connections Dialog shows up.

Remote Gitora Connection Management

Click the + button end enter the following information:

Alias: A descriptive name for the Gitora Server of the source database. (No spaces or special characters.

Protocol: http

IP: The IP of the Gitora Server of the source database. This information can be obtained from the URL of the Gitora Application of the source database.

Port: The port of the Gitora Server. This information can be obtained from the URL of the Gitora Application of the source database.

Context: If the URL of the Gitora Application for the source database is http://192.168.15:8080/GitoraForSourceDB/main.jsp?name=Gitora then the value for context is GitoraForSourceDB

Root Folder: Name of the database schema of the Gitora installation in the source database, in lowercase.

Click OK to save the changes.

Your Gitora installation (destination) is now ready to clone, fetch and pull from the remote (source) Gitora installation.

Important Note: Gitora 2.0 assumes the presence of a secure network. In other words, do not use public IP addresses for connecting to remote Gitora installations. Authentication to connect to a public Gitora installation will be implemented in a future 2.x version.